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Baird achieved this, where other inventors had failed, by obtaining a better photoelectric cell and improving the signal conditioning from the photocell and the video amplifier.In his first attempts to develop a working television system, Baird experimented with the Nipkow disk, and in February 1924 demonstrated to the Radio Times that a semi-mechanical analogue television system was possible by transmitting moving silhouette images, such as his fingers wiggling, in his London laboratory.Baird gave the first public demonstration of moving silhouette images by television at Selfridges department store in London in a three-week series of demonstrations beginning on March 25, 1925.

Although Baird's electromechanical system was eventually displaced by purely electronic systems (such as those of Vladimir Zworykin and Philo Farnsworth), his early successes demonstrating working television broadcasts and his colour and cinema television work earn him a prominent place in television's invention. He was educated at Larchfield Academy (now part of Lomond School), Helensburgh; the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College (which later became the University of Strathclyde); and the University of Glasgow.

His degree course was interrupted by World War I and he never returned to graduate.

Although the development of television was the result of work by many inventors, Baird is one of its foremost pioneers and made major advances in the field.

He is generally credited with being the first person to produce a live, moving television image in halftones by reflected light.

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Text is available under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license; additional terms may apply.Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.John Logie Baird ( August 13 1888 – June 14 1946) was a Scottish engineer and inventor of the world's first working television system.Baird went downstairs and fetched an office worker, 20-year-old William Edward Taynton, to see what a human face would look like, and Taynton became the first person to be televised in full tonal range.On January 26, 1926 Baird repeated the transmission for members of the Royal Institution and a reporter from The Times in his laboratory at 22 Frith Street in the Soho district of London.By this time he had improved the scan rate to 12.5 pictures a second.