Dating for people with mental illnes dating uk uk

treat her differently just because she has a mental illness.

Let's call a spade a spade - until the person manages to recover, dating someone in this situation is going to be a roller-coaster.

If I really liked her, then I'd be more than happy to go through the messy stuff with her and do everything in my power to help her get better.In saying that, however, I can understand how some people might not want to date someone in that position.Not everyone has a propensity to deal with such difficulties - even if those difficulties are likely to be temporary because the mentally ill party is receiving treatment.A recent study by the UK mental health charity Time To Change found that 57% of single people would not date someone with a mental illness.When the study was published, numerous people tweeted or Facebook messaged me the results, and expressed their disappointment and disgust about the stigma surrounding mental illness.

Mental illness is treatable, and if the girl in question had sought help for her illness and had learned how to manage it such that it had minimal or no impact on her life, then I'd feel privileged to date her.

To not do so in this particular situation would be to stigmatise her - i.e.

My position in such an instance would be this: if I really liked the girl, then I would still keep dating her.

This is because, as I qualified above, she's doing the right things to try and get better - which means that she'd be taking medication, committing herself to therapy, reading self-help books, eating well, sleeping well and exercising frequently.

If she was doing things like this and I really liked her, then I'd definitely still love to date her, because all the drama would be temporary.

Since she's doing the right things to beat her illness, then over time, she eventually would.